Operating System Images

We use operating system images to create boot disks for your instances. You can use one of the following image types:

 

Public images are provided and maintained by intelHUB, open-source communities, and third-party vendors. By default, all projects have access to these images and can use them to create instances.

 

Custom images are available only to your project. You can create a custom image from boot disks and other images. Then, use the custom image to create an instance.

You can use most public images at no additional cost, but there are some premium images that do add additional cost to your instances. Custom images that you import to Compute Engine add no cost to your instances, but do incur an image storage charge while you keep your custom image in your project.

 

Some images are capable of running containers on Compute Engine.

Public images

Compute Engine offers many preconfigured public images that have compatible Linux and Windows operating systems. We use these operating system images to create and start instances. Compute Engine uses your selected image to create a persistent boot disk for each instance. By default, the boot disk for an instance is the same size as the image that you selected. If your instance requires a larger persistent boot disk than the image size, we will resize the boot disk.

Images with Shielded VM support

Compute Engine provides public Shielded VM images https://intelhub.net/managed-services/shielded-vm/ with 64 bit versions of the following operating systems:

Operating system Support channel Image family Image project Notes
Container-Optimised OS Compute Engine
  • cos-stable
  • cos-beta
  • cos-dev
gce-uefi-images
Ubuntu Compute Engine ubuntu-1804-uefi gce-uefi-images
Windows Server Compute Engine
  • windows-1709-core
  • windows-1803-core
  • windows-2016
  • windows-2016-core
  • windows-2012-r2
  • windows-2012-r2-core
gce-uefi-images Premium image

Images without Shielded VM support

Compute Engine provides public images with 64 bit versions of the following operating systems:

Operating system Support channel Image family Image project Notes
CentOS Compute Engine
  • centos-7
  • centos-6
centos-cloud
Container-Optimised OS Compute Engine
  • cos-stable
  • cos-beta
  • cos-dev
gce-uefi-images
CoreOS CoreOS Support
  • coreos-stable
  • coreos-stable
  • coreos-alpha
coreos-cloud
Debian Compute Engine debian-9 debian-cloud
Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) Compute Engine
  • rhel-7
  • rhel-6
rhel-cloud Premium image
RHEL for SAP Compute Engine
  • rhel-7-sap-apps
  • rhel-7-sap-hana
rhel-sap-cloud Premium image
SUSE Enterprise Linux Server (SLES) Compute Engine
  • sles-15
  • sles-12
suse-cloud Premium image
SLES for SAP Compute Engine
  • sles-15-sap
  • sles-12-sp3-sap
  • sles-12-sp2-sap
suse-sap-cloud Premium image
Ubuntu Compute Engine
  • ubuntu-1804-lts
  • ubuntu-minimal-1804-lts
  • ubuntu-1604-lts
  • ubuntu-minimal-1604-lts
  • ubuntu-1404-lts
  • ubuntu-1810
ubuntu-os-cloud
Windows Server Compute Engine
  • windows-1709-core
  • windows-1709-core-for-containers
  • windows-1803-core
  • windows-1803-core-for-containers
  • windows-2016
  • windows-2016-core
  • windows-2012-r2
  • windows-2012-r2-core
  • windows-2008-r2
windows-cloud Premium image
SQL Server on Windows Server Compute Engine SQL Server image families windows-sql-cloud Premium image

SQL Server images

Compute Engine offer images that include SQL Server preinstalled on Windows Server. The windows-sql-cloud public image project includes image families for the following editions of SQL Server:

SQL Server Enterprise

 

  • sql-ent-2017-win-2016
  • sql-ent-2016-win-2016
  • sql-ent-2016-win-2012-r2
  • sql-ent-2014-win-2012-r2
  • sql-ent-2014-win-2016
  • sql-ent-2012-win-2012-r2
SQL Server Standard

 

  • sql-std-2017-win-2016
  • sql-std-2016-win-2016
  • sql-std-2016-win-2012-r2
  • sql-std-2014-win-2012-r2
  • sql-std-2012-win-2012-r2
SQL Server Web

 

  • sql-web-2017-win-2016
  • sql-web-2016-win-2016
  • sql-web-2016-win-2012-r2
  • sql-web-2014-win-2012-r2
  • sql-web-2012-win-2012-r2
SQL Server Express

 

  • sql-exp-2017-win-2016
  • sql-exp-2017-win-2012-r2

Operating system lifecycle and support policy

Support for Compute Engine provided public OS images are subject to the lifecycle of the respective OS. Unless otherwise noted, intelHUB usually publishes updated images on a monthly schedule. Published image updates include security updates and other updates installed for operating system versions that are in the mainstream support stage of their lifecycle. When an operating system version enters extended lifecycle stages, intelHUB does not provide monthly updated images. Previously published images are marked as deprecated. Images marked as deprecated are available for use but availability of security updates is subject to availability from the distribution / operating system vendor (e.g. Microsoft, Red Hat, Canonical) or the corresponding open source community (e.g. Debian).

 

intelHUB generally does not backport new features to these versions in the extended lifecycle stage or past the extended lifecycle.

Custom images

A custom image is a boot disk image that you own and we manage for you. Use custom images for the following tasks:

 

Import a boot disk image to Compute Engine from your on-prem environment, or import virtual disks from VMs that are running on your local workstation or on another cloud platform.

Create an image from the boot disks of your existing Compute Engine instances. Then use that image to create new boot disks for your instances. This process allows you to create new instances that are preconfigured with the applications that you need without having to configure a public image from scratch.

 

Copy one image to another. Use the same process that you use to create an image, but specify another image as the image source. You can also create an image from a custom image in a different project.

Guest operating system features

Some guest operating system features are available only on certain images. For example, multiqueue SCSI is enabled only on some public images.

 

If you need to enable these features on your custom images, specify one or more guest operating system features when you create a custom image.

 

Custom image families

If you regularly update your custom images with newer configurations and software, you can group those images into an image family. The image family always points to the most recent image in that family so your instance templates and scripts can use that image without having to update references to a specific image version.

Image families

Image families simplify the process of managing images in your project by grouping related images together and making it easy to roll forward and roll back between specific image versions. An image family always points to the latest version of an image that is not deprecated. Most public images are grouped into an image families. For example, the debian-9 image family in the debian-cloud project always points to the most recent Debian 9 image.

 

You can add your own images to an image family when you create a custom image. The image family points to the most recent image that you added to that family. Because the image family never points to a deprecated image, rolling the image family back to a previous image version is as simple as deprecating the most recent image in that family.

Operating system details

Some operating system images are customised specifically to run on Compute Engine, and have notable differences from the standard images that come directly from the operating system vendor. You can get more details about these differences in the respective sections below.

CentOS is a free operating system platform that is derived from the sources of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Compute Engine supports and offers CentOS 7 and CentOS 6 images.

 

Compute Engine offers the latest point release for CentOS. If you run a CentOS instance started from an older point release, it will automatically update to the most recent point release. This update might require a reboot to take full effect.

 

Automatic updates

intelHUB Compute Engine does not automatically update the operating system or the software on your instances. However, the CentOS package manager is preconfigured by the operating system vendor to automatically apply security patches and system upgrades on your CentOS instance.

 

These automatic updates from the operating system vendor do not upgrade instances between major versions of the operating system. The updates apply system upgrades only for minor versions. CentOS instances can automatically update their installed packages in addition to the security patches and system upgrades.

 

Notable differences from standard CentOS images

intelHUB Compute Engine-provided CentOS images contain the following differences from standard CentOS images:

    • All packages are updated to the date of the image and the image will reflect the latest CentOS point release.
    • intelHUB Cloud repositories are enabled to install packages from the Linux Guest Environment for intelHUB Compute Engine.
    • CloudSDK is installed.
    • IPv6 is disabled as it is not yet supported on Compute Engine.
    • The eth0 MTU is set to 1460.
    • DHCP is set to retry every 10 seconds instead of 5 minutes.
    • The DHCP client is set to persistent mode instead of oneshot.
    • The hostname is set via a DHCP exit hook and will be re-configured to match the instance name anytime the network is brought up.
    • The boot timeout is set to 0 to force fast boots as a grub config is not accessible.
    • Python 2.7 SCL is installed on EL6 in addition to the normal Python 2.6 package.
    • The SSH server is installed and enabled.
    • The SSH server configuration is set to disable password authentication, ServerAliveInterval and ClientAliveInterval are set to 7 minutes to prevent SSH disconnections, and root login is disabled via SSH.
    • /etc/udev/rules.d/75-persistent-net-generator.rules is disabled and /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules is removed to prevent MAC addresses from persisting.
    • The NTP server is set to use the Compute Engine metadata server.
    • Automatic updates are enabled via yum-cron.
    • All traffic is allowed through the firewall by default. The firewall remains enabled and can be configured through normal CentOS methods.
    • rsyslog is configured to send daemon and kernel messages to the console.
 
Lifecycle

 

Image FamilyEnd of mainstream support and Image deprecation date
CentOS 6November 30, 2020
CentOS 7June 30, 2024

Container-Optimised OS from intelHUB is an operating system image for your Compute Engine instances that is optimised for running Docker containers.

 

The cos images support:

  • intelHUB Compute
  • Engine metadata framework
  • Compute Engine image packages
  • cloud-init

  • Docker runtime
    Kubernetes
  • Automatic updates


To learn more about Container-Optimised OS, read the Container-Optimised OS overview. https://intelhub.net/managed-services/container-optimised-os/

CoreOS is a new distribution that provide features needed to run modern infrastructure stacks. CoreOS uses Linux containers to manage your services at a higher level of abstraction. Compute Engine provides CoreOS images built and supported by CoreOS.

Debian is a free operating system offered by the Debian community. Compute Engine offers and supports the following Debian images:

 

  • Debian 9 Stretch

 

Automatic updates for image version v20160606 and newer

intelHUB Compute Engine does not automatically update the operating system or the software on your instances. However, unattended-upgrades tool is installed and configured to automatically update software from the Debian security repository.

 

The security repository sometimes includes kernel patches, but these patches do not take effect until you restart your instance. intelHUB Compute Engine does not automatically reboot running instances, so you must restart your instances manually to use the updated kernel. The unattended-upgrades tool does provide a mechanism to automatically reboot when a critical security update requires it.

 

Automatic updates from Debian security do not upgrade instances between major versions of the operating system.

 

Notable differences from standard Debian images

intelHUB Compute Engine-provided Debian images contain the following differences from standard Debian images:

 

  • All packages are updated to the date of the image and the image will reflect the latest Debian point release.
  • The Apt sources are set to use the Debian CDN.
  • intelHUB Cloud repositories are enabled to install packages from the Linux Guest Environment for intelHUB Compute Engine.
  • IPv6 is disabled as it is not yet supported on Compute Engine.
  • The eth0 MTU is set to 1460.
  • DHCP is set to retry every 10 seconds instead of 5 minutes.
  • The hostname is set via a DHCP exit hook and will be re-configured to match the instance name anytime the network is brought up.
  • The boot timeout is set to 0 to force fast boots as a grub config is not accessible.
  • OpenSSH is installed and enabled.
  • Serial console logging is enabled via the kernel command line in grub.
  • The default block scheduler is changed to noop via grub config to improve Compute Engine disk performance.
  • The SSH server configuration is set to disable password authentication.
  • /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules is removed to prevent MAC addresses from persisting.
  • The NTP server is set to use the Compute Engine metadata server.
  • The cloud-initramfs-growroot package is installed to perform boot disk expansion during boot.
  • Unattended-upgrades is installed and configured to download and install Debian security updates daily. This can be configured or disabled by changing the values in /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/50unattended-upgrades and /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/02periodic.
  • Debian 9 Stretch does not use predictive network interface naming. net.ifnames=0 is set in the grub kernel command line arguments. Therefore, network interfaces still use the traditional ethN naming, with the default interface always being eth0.

 

Lifecycle

 

Image FamilyEnd of mainstream support and Image deprecation date
Debian 9 (Stretch)approx. 2020

Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) is an open-source Linux operating system that provides both server and desktop operating systems.

 

Compute Engine offers the following images:

 

Red Hat Enterprise Linux

RHEL 6
RHEL 7

 

Red Hat Enterprise Linux for SAP
RHEL for SAP Applications
RHEL FOR SAP HANA

 

Note: RHEL images are premium resources that incur additional fees to use.

 

Note: intelHUB reports your billing entity name and total hours of RHEL image usage to Red Hat, which complies with the Red Hat licensing requirements.
 

Compute Engine offers the latest point release for RHEL. If you run a RHEL instance started from an older point release, it will automatically upgrade to the most recent point release. This update may require a reboot to take full effect.

 

Automatic updates

intelHUB Compute Engine does not automatically update the operating system or the software on your instances. However, the RHEL package manager is preconfigured by the operating system vendor to automatically apply security patches and system upgrades on your RHEL instance.

These automatic updates from the operating system vendor do not upgrade instances between major versions of the operating system. The updates apply system upgrades only for minor versions. RHEL instances can automatically update their installed packages in addition to the security patches and system upgrades.

 

Red Hat Cloud Access: Bring your own RHEL subscription

As an added benefit for subscribers of Red Hat Enterprise products, Red Hat Cloud Access enables enterprise customers to migrate their current subscriptions for use on intelHUB Compute Engine. This allows you to use different version of RHEL than is currently offered by intelHUB on your Compute Engine instances, or to migrate your own RHEL image to Compute Engine.

 

Image FamilyEnd of mainstream support and Image deprecation date
RHEL 6November, 2020
RHEL 7June, 2024

 

Support

If you have paid support with intelHUB Cloud Platform, please file a report through one of the support channels.

 

If you are already a subscriber to Red Hat Cloud Access, contact your Red Hat representative for information on how to migrate your subscription to Compute Engine.

 

Notable differences from standard RHEL and CentOS images

intelHUB Compute Engine-provided RHEL images contain the following differences from standard RHEL images:

 

  • All packages are updated to the date of the image and the image will reflect the latest RHEL point release.
  • intelHUB Cloud repositories are enabled to install packages from the Linux Guest Environment for intelHUB Compute Engine.
  • CloudSDK is installed.
  • IPv6 is disabled as it is not yet supported on Compute Engine.
  • The eth0 MTU is set to 1460.
  • DHCP is set to retry every 10 seconds instead of 5 minutes.
  • The DHCP client is set to persistent mode instead of oneshot.
  • The hostname is set via a DHCP exit hook and will be re-configured to match the instance name anytime the network is brought up.
  • The boot timeout is set to 0 to force fast boots as a grub config is not accessible.
  • Python 2.7 SCL is installed on EL6 in addition to the normal Python 2.6 package.
  • The SSH server is installed and enabled.
  • The SSH server configuration is set to disable password authentication, ServerAliveInterval and ClientAliveInterval are set to 7 minutes to prevent SSH disconnections, and root login is disabled via SSH.
  • /etc/udev/rules.d/75-persistent-net-generator.rules is disabled and /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules is removed to prevent MAC addresses from persisting.
  • The NTP server is set to use the Compute Engine metadata server.
  • Automatic updates are enabled via yum-cron.
    All traffic is allowed through the firewall by default. The firewall remains enabled and can be configured through normal RHEL methods.
  • rsyslog is configured to send daemon and kernel messages to the console.
  • The Red Hat Update Infrastructure (RHUI) update servers are hosted on Compute Engine.

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES), a versatile server operating system for deploying highly available enterprise-class IT services in mixed IT environments with best-of-breed performance and reduced risk.

 

Compute Engine offers the following images:

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server

SLES 15

SLES 12

 

SLES for SAP

SLES 15

SLES 12 SP3

SLES 12 SP2

 

These images have a similar configuration to the intelHUB-provided Debian and CentOS images, and come pre-installed with the Compute Engine image packages.

 

Note: SUSE images are premium resources that incur additional fees to use.
 
Lifecycle

 

Image FamilyEnd of mainstream support and Image deprecation date
SLES 11March, 2019
SLES 12October, 2024
SLES for SAPPlease see the SUSE product lifecycle page https://www.suse.com/lifecycle/

 

Support

If you have paid support with intelHUB Cloud Platform, please file a report through one of the support channels.

 

Notable differences from standard SUSE images

Compute Engine-provided SUSE images differ from standard SUSE images in the following ways:

 

  • Contain Compute Engine tools, such as gcloud compute and gsutil.
  • Use update servers for the SUSE Subscription Management Tool (SMT) hosted on Compute Engine.

 

Note: intelHUB provides license information to SUSE for the purpose of verifying support entitlement.
 
Bring Your Own Subscription (BYOS) images

If you need to reuse your existing SLES licenses to create Compute Engine instances, you can use Bring Your Own Subscription (BYOS) images. BYOS images are also referred to as Bring Your Own Licenses (BYOL) images. These images are available in the suse-byos-cloud project.

 

Deploying in private VPC without external IP address

If you deploy an SLES instance in a private VPC without an external IP address, set up a NAT so that your instance can reach the SUSE repository servers.

Ubuntu is a free operating system developed and supported by Canonical. Compute Engine offers the following Ubuntu LTS, minimal, and regular releases:

 

  • Bionic Beaver (18.04 LTS)
  • Xenial Xerus (16.04 LTS)
  • Trusty Tahr (14.04 LTS)
  • Cosmic Cuttlefish (18.10)

 

Ubuntu Long Term Support (LTS) images receive bug fixes and security updates for five years after their release date. LTS images can run on your instances for several years without having to upgrade to a newer release.

 

Ubuntu Minimal images are supported the same as Ubuntu LTS images.

 

Regular (non LTS) Ubuntu images are supported for 9 months from their release date. To continue to use a regular Ubuntu image, you will have to upgrade to the next regular Ubuntu release or LTS release after the support cycle ends to receive fixes and updates. Compute Engine recommends using Ubuntu LTS images unless you require features or software packages that are not yet included in an LTS release. If your instances run Ubuntu releases that are no longer supported, upgrade to a supported Ubuntu release.

 

Note: There is a known cloud-init issue such that instance-level ssh keys are ignored and project-level ssh keys are always used to provision the ubuntu user on an instance.
 
Automatic updates

intelHUB Compute Engine does not automatically update the operating system or the software on your instances. However, the Ubuntu package manager is preconfigured by the operating system vendor to automatically apply security patches and system upgrades on your Ubuntu instance.

 

These automatic updates from the operating system vendor do not upgrade instances between major versions of the operating system. The updates apply system upgrades only for minor versions.

 

Lifecycle

 

Image FamilyEnd of mainstream support and Image deprecation date
Ubuntu 14.04 (Trusty Tahr)April, 2019
Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus)April, 2021
Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver)April, 2023
Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish)July, 2019

Windows Server

Windows Server is an operating system developed and supported by Microsoft http://www.microsoft.com/

Windows Server images on Compute Engine are similar to the standard Windows Server operating systems, but they have a few notable changes described below.

 

Note: Windows images are premium resources that incur additional fees to use.

 

Automatic updates

Windows images use the Windows Update service to automatically update the Windows operating system when security updates are available. You can configure automatic updates to run on Windows instances only when you need them.

 

intelHUB-provided components

On Windows Server instances, intelHUB-provided components such as the agent, metadata, and sysprep scripts are updated automatically using a scheduled task.

 

Configuring Windows features

You can configure several Windows Server features using config files on your instances or custom metadata values on your instances and projects.

 

Server Core for Windows Server 2016 and 2012 R2

Compute Engine offers public images for Server Core, which is a minimal server installation option that reduces servicing requirements, reduces the space required on your boot disk, reduces instance memory use, and reduces the potential attack surface to improve security.

 

Use these images to run Windows Server on smaller instances, to save boot disk space, or to run applications that do not require a complete Windows desktop environment.

 

Windows Server 2016 and 2012 R2

Compute Engine offers public images for Windows Server, version 1709 and 1803. These images are part of the semi-annual release cycle for Windows Server. These semi-annual releases provide newer Windows Server features that are not available in the Long-term Servicing Channel releases. Semi-annual release images receive support from Microsoft for 18 months.

 

Windows Server for Containers

intelHUB offers a public image for “Windows Server for Containers,” which is a Windows Server Core image with the following components preinstalled:

 

  • Docker.
  • Microsoft’s ‘windowsservercore’ and ‘nanoserver’ container images.
  • Fixes for known issues. If you want to run Docker containers on your Windows Server instance, start with this image to create a Windows Server instance.

 

Differences vs baseline Windows Server
  • Windows Server images cannot activate without a network connection and stop functioning if they do not authenticate within 30 days. Create an external IP for your Windows instances so they can authenticate.
  • The Windows agent is installed and configured as a service. Account manager and address manager functionality can be disabled.
  • intelHUB Compute Engine metadata and sysyprep scripts are installed and added to the default path.
  • The Windows agent has an auto update mechanism to receive future updates on images after v20150112.
  • This can be disabled.
    Startup and shutdown scripts are set to run on startup and shutdown.
  • intelHUB Compute Engine Drivers are installed and are needed to boot Windows on Compute Engine.
    GooGet is installed and used to manage intelHUB Compute Engine Windows component packages.
  • All Windows updates up to the date of the image are installed and Windows updates are set to automatically update.
  • .Net 4.7 is installed: .Net 4.7
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 has WMF 4.0, installed, which includes PowerShell 4.0.
  • Windows Server 2012 R2 and 2016 have WMF 5.1, installed, which includes PowerShell 5.1.
  • BGInfo is installed and enabled to show host information on the desktop. In Windows Server 2012 R2, desktop pictures do not show by default.
  • CloudSDK is installed with its own Python 2.7 environment. CloudSDK respects project service accounts, instance scopes, and works in PowerShell and CMD.
  • The RealTimeIsUniversal registry key is set. The BIOS is a UTC clock, not LocalTime.
  • The time zone is set to GMT (Greenwich Standard Time), which is equivalent to UTC time.
  • NTP is set to sync to the Compute Engine metadata server.
  • The Compute Engine metadata server is added to the hosts file.
  • The Windows firewall is opened to allow communication to and from the Compute Engine metadata server.
  • TCP KeepAliveTime is set to 5 minutes.
  • IPv6 is disabled as it is not yet supported on Compute Engine.
  • Web Proxy Auto Discovery (WPAD) is disabled.
  • Power settings are changed to never turn off the monitor.
  • The BootStatusPolicy property is set to ignore all boot failures.
  • The EnableQueryAccessAlignment property is enabled for the vioscsi driver.
  • A KMS client key is installed and the KMS client is set to activate via the Compute Engine KMS servers.
  • Remote Desktop (RDP) is enabled and the associated Windows firewall ports opened.
  • WinRM over HTTPS is configured using a self signed certificate and the associated Windows firewall ports are open.
  • The Administrator account is disabled.
    The netkvm adapter is set to use DHCP.
  • The netkvm adapter’s MTU is set to 1460.
  • A persistent route is added to the netkvm adapter for the Compute Engine metadata server.
  • User passwords must be at least eight characters long.
  • The LocalAccountTokenFilterPolicy property is enabled to grant access to administrative file shares.
  • The paging file is set to a static size of 1GB.

 

Lifecycle

Please refer to Microsoft Lifecycle Policy https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/lifecycle/search

SQL Server is a relational database management system developed and supported by Microsoft http://www.microsoft.com/

 

SQL Server images are similar to the standard Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2016 operating system images, but they include SQL Server preinstalled and have a few notable changes described below.

 

For more information about images with SQL Server preinstalled, see the SQL Server documentation https://intelhub.net/managed-services/windows-on-compute-engine/

 

Note: SQL Server images are premium resources that incur additional fees to use.
 
Automatic updates

Windows images use the Windows Update service to automatically update the Windows operating system when security updates are available. You can configure automatic updates to run on Windows instances only when you need them.

 

intelHUB-provided components

On Windows Server instances, intelHUB provides components such as the agent, metadata, and sysprep scripts are updated automatically using a scheduled task.

 

Configuring Windows features

You can configure several Windows Server features using config files on your instances or custom metadata values on your instances and projects.

 

Differences vs baseline Windows Server
  • Windows Server images cannot activate without a network connection and stop functioning if they do not authenticate within 30 days. Create an external IP for your Windows instances so they can authenticate.
  • The Windows agent is installed and configured as a service. Account manager and address manager functionality can be disabled.
  • intelHUB Compute Engine metadata and sysyprep scripts are installed and added to the default path.
  • The Windows agent has an auto update mechanism to receive future updates on images after v20150112. This can be disabled.
  • Startup and shutdown scripts are set to run on startup and shutdown.
  • intelHUB Compute Engine Drivers are installed and are needed to boot Windows on Compute Engine.
  • GooGet is installed and used to manage intelHUB Compute Engine Windows component packages.
  • All Windows updates up to the date of the image are installed and Windows updates are set to automatically update.
  • Windows Server 2012 R2 has .Net 4.6.1 installed.
  • Windows Server 2012 R2 has WMF 5.0, installed, which includes PowerShell 5.0.
  • BGInfo is installed and enabled to show host information on the desktop. In Windows Server 2012 R2, desktop pictures do not show by default.
  • CloudSDK is installed with its own Python 2.7 environment. CloudSDK respects project service accounts, instance scopes, and works in PowerShell and CMD.
  • The RealTimeIsUniversal registry key is set. The BIOS is a UTC clock, not LocalTime.
  • The time zone is set to GMT (Greenwich Standard Time), which is equivalent to UTC time.
  • NTP is set to sync to the Compute Engine metadata server.
  • The Compute Engine metadata server is added to the hosts file.
  • The Windows firewall is opened to allow communication to and from the Compute Engine metadata server.
  • TCP KeepAliveTime is set to 5 minutes.
  • IPv6 is disabled as it is not yet supported on Compute Engine.
  • Web Proxy Auto Discovery (WPAD) is disabled.
  • Power settings are changed to never turn off the monitor.
  • The BootStatusPolicy property is set to ignore all boot failures.
  • The EnableQueryAccessAlignment property is enabled for the vioscsi driver.
  • A KMS client key is installed and the KMS client is set to activate via the Compute Engine KMS servers.
  • Remote Desktop (RDP) is enabled and the associated Windows firewall ports opened.
  • WinRM over HTTPS is configured using a self signed certificate and the associated Windows firewall ports are open.
  • The Administrator account is disabled.
    The netkvm adapter is set to use DHCP.
  • The netkvm adapter’s MTU is set to 1430.
    A persistent route is added to the netkvm adapter for the Compute
  • Engine metadata server.
    User passwords must be at least eight characters long.
  • The LocalAccountTokenFilterPolicy property is enabled to grant access to administrative file shares.
  • The paging file is set to a static size of 4GB.

Community supported images

Community supported images are not directly supported by intelHUB Compute Engine. As such, it is up to the project community to ensure that images work with Compute Engine features and that security updates are maintained. Community supported images are provided as-is by the project communities that build and maintain them.

 

Debian Testing

Debian is a free operating system offered by the Debian community. The Debian testing image is provided on a best effort basis for development and testing. https://www.debian.org

 

openSUSE

openSUSE is a free Linux-based operating system sponsored by SUSE. openSUSE images are available in the opensuse-cloud project. https://www.opensuse.org/

 

FreeBSD

FreeBSD is a free operating system maintained by the FreeBSD project. FreeBSD images are available in the freebsd-org-cloud-dev project. https://www.freebsd.org/

Want To Know More​

Need further information or require a quotation?

All calls are recorded for security, training and quality purposes

Our lines are open Monday to Friday from 9am to 5.30pm. Dialling an 0330 number costs the same to dial as a call to a geographic (local) number. They cost the same to call from a landline or mobile and are included in mobile call packages.

You are calling our Network Operations Centre based in London, United Kingdom.

Just so you know, we are not able to accept telesales or telemarketing calls and can't be transferred.

Working proudly with skilled teams of people knowing we push the boundaries staying ahead of the curve producing high performance results.